Mystery · Romance · Science Fiction · YA

“Passenger” by Alexandra Bracken

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Synopsis:

In one devastating night, violin prodigy Etta Spencer loses everything she knows and loves. Thrust into an unfamiliar world by a stranger with a dangerous agenda, Etta is certain of only one thing: she has traveled not just miles but years from home. And she’s inherited a legacy she knows nothing about from a family whose existence she’s never heard of. Until now.

Nicholas Carter is content with his life at sea, free from the Ironwoods—a powerful family in the colonies—and the servitude he’s known at their hands. But with the arrival of an unusual passenger on his ship comes the insistent pull of the past that he can’t escape and the family that won’t let him go so easily. Now the Ironwoods are searching for a stolen object of untold value, one they believe only Etta, Nicholas’ passenger, can find. In order to protect her, he must ensure she brings it back to them—whether she wants to or not.

Together, Etta and Nicholas embark on a perilous journey across centuries and continents, piecing together clues left behind by the traveler who will do anything to keep the object out of the Ironwoods’ grasp. But as they get closer to the truth of their search, and the deadly game the Ironwoods are playing, treacherous forces threaten to separate Etta not only from Nicholas but from her path home… forever.

Review:

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The story is about Etta, who thinks she has a normal life. She lives with her mom and has Alice as her instructor. Etta loves playing violin and she has always waited for her debut. But on the day of her concert, everything changes. Alice is killed and Etta is kidnapped.

Etta wakes up on a ship and realizes she’s being delivered to someone and she’s in a different era. The story continues with her figuring out ways to escape that place and learning her family secrets. But then Etta finds out that Ironwood has kept her mother hostage, so she decides to meet him and ask what he wants from her.

Ironwood wants Etta to find the Astrolabe, which can detect passages for time travelling. But soon Etta finds out what the Astrolabe can actually do and decides to destroy it the moment she finds it. Together Etta and Nicholas follow her mom’s clues to find the Astrolabe and the clues take them to different centuries.

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The plot sounded very interesting so I picked this one up. Unfortunately, I did not like it. The story has potential but the author stretched it too much. It was so boring that it took me almost 2 months to finish it. As I’ve said before, I don’t like to leave a book unfinished so I had to finish it no matter what.

It felt like the author wanted to use every word she could in each sentence.

His fingers unhooked from hers, following that same path up her arm, and then back down it again. The feeling was so distracting, so good, so sweet against her clammy skin. She didn’t choose a piece from her repertoire; Etta gave herself over to the notes that started streaming through her mind, rising from somewhere deep inside of her.

The melody of her heart had no name; it was quick, and light. It rolled with the waves, falling as the breath left his chest, rising as he inhaled. It was the rain sliding down the glass; the fog spreading its fingers over the water. The creaking of a ship’s great body. The secrets whispered by the wind, and the unseen life that moved below.

It was the flame of one last candle.

 I usually feel relaxed when I read a book but this book really stressed me out.

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The plot twist was good though, very much unexpected. I’m not sure i would read the next book in this series. What do you guys think about “Passenger”? Have you read it yet? If you have, let me know your thoughts on it. Thank you so much for stopping by and I’ll talk to you in my next post ❤

Rating:

♥ ♥  ♡ ♡

6

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